The Whinnies

About the Whinnies Local Nature Reserve

This former iron work site is now an attractive 5 hectare Local Nature Reserve managed by Darlington Borough Council. Situated between the famous Darlington to Stockton railway line and the A67, the old spoil heaps are calcium rich and have transformed over the years to create a variety of wildlife habitats including banks and pools.

The meadows at the Whinnies are really special. A very diverse mix of grassland plants are present with 15 species of grass, including frequent patches of quaking-grass and the rarer heath-grass. Amongst over 50 wild flowers present are locally scarce devil’s-bit scabious, the late-flowering umbellifer pepper-saxifrage, and the semi-parasites yellow-rattle and eyebright (rarely seen in the Tees Valley plain). Nearby to the grassland grow the locally rare dyer’s-greenweed and the beautiful but tiny autumn gentian.

There are some surfaced footpaths through the site which are suitable for pushchairs and wheelchairs It is used by local dog walkers, joggers and visiting naturalists. The site is great place for watching for butterflies and birds. Notable bird species present on site include reed bunting, lapwing, curlew, skylark, tree sparrow, linnet, bullfinch, yellow hammer and kestrel. During the summer moths the ponds are a great place to watch dragonflies and damselflies and dragonflies,

Friends needed!

This beautiful nature reserve is doesn’t have a friends group at the moment. The Tees Valley Wild Green Places Project will be seeking to get one started, so If you are a visitor to the site  are interested in getting involved please get in touch with us.

Photographs by Phil Roxby and Pippa Smaling
The Whinnies was last modified: January 21st, 2016 by Sue Antrobus

Contact Details

access via Woolsington Drive
Middleton St George
Darlington
DL2 1UX

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